How Orange is the New Black is not the New White(out)

1st photo

Image via Complex.com

In 2008, the NAACP released a report called Out of Focus, Out of Sync, in which they critiqued what they called a “whiteout” of American TV, drawing attention to both the complete neglect of actors of color on television, and a severe lack of writers of color, too. As a somewhat serious television connoisseur, I’d argue that over the next five years nothing really changed much, save for the rise of Mindy Kaling and Damon Wayans, Jr.’s turns on both ABC’s Happy Endings and FOX’s The New Girl.

This barren media landscape changed for the better this summer with the arrival of Netflix’s third foray into original programming: Orange is the New Black. Ostensibly the story of a privileged white woman sent to a women’s prison called Litchfield Penitentiary for carrying a bag of cash in a drug deal a decade prior, OITNB expands what could have been a limited universe by constructing fully realized characters, ones which offer rare depictions of underrepresented groups: namely women of color, lesbians and the transgendered. In doing so, it pushes back on much of the scholarship surrounding typical media representations. Continue reading

Interview with artist Kip Fulbeck

The third in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Kip Fulbeck.

Image by Kip Fulbeck from The Hapa Project

Image by Kip Fulbeck from The Hapa Project

— Edited by Kendal Feider

Interview with Richard Lou

Interview with Gina Osterloh

Interview with Artist Richard Lou

The second in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Richard Lou.

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https://soundcloud.com/com495/november-11-2013-richard-lou-1

— Edited by Seo Song

Interview with Gina Osterloh

Remembering the Forgotten Riots

jakarta

(Photo by : Stefan Magdalinski)

In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, there are two racial groups – native Indonesians and the Chinese-Indonesians. There was a dark period of time in every Indonesian-Chinese’s history that went unrecorded in history books. It was the 1998 riot.

When I found out about the riot, I was in Melbourne on a family trip without my father. The news station in Melbourne aired the horrific scenes that were happening back home. Buildings were being burned, corpses lay on the ground and victims were brutally injured. Everything back home looked like it came from a war scene in a movie.

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DUAL IDENTITIES

Before moving to the United States, racial identity was simple for Salwa Hoque. She knew who she was: a woman, a Muslim, a Bengali. But that’s not who she is anymore. Moving to Seattle  has forced her to adapt in many ways, change some of her old beliefs. While some of her old friends from home can’t believe how different she is, she refuses to give up some of her old self.

DSC_0721You get a sense of her clashing identities the minute you walk into her apartment. You see one pair of her traditional sandals, flanked by a pair of TOMS on one side, and a pair of boots on the other.

DSC_0693She cooks stuffed chicken, but insists on using traditional spices she brought from Bangladesh, because “the food here is just too bland.”

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South Seattle, 98118: Everyday Diversity

Fou Lee Market and Deli; my parents and grandparents have been buying groceries for foreign dishes here for years!

Fou Lee Market and Deli; my parents and grandparents have been buying groceries for foreign dishes here for years!

Seattle's Filipino Influence Top: The Filipino Community Center aka the Filipino after party spot (I'm probably going to have my wedding reception here). Bottom: A Bridge named after Filipino Nationalist Jose Rizal.

Seattle’s Filipino Influence
Top: The Filipino Community Center aka the Filipino after party spot (I’m probably going to have my wedding reception here).
Bottom: A Bridge named after Filipino Nationalist Jose Rizal.

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Interview with Gina Osterloh

After visiting the “War Baby Love Child” exhibit of mixed race Asian American art at the Wing Luke Museum, we interviewed several of the artists.

This first podcast is an interview with Gina Osterloh. Keep checking back for more interviews.

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Rapture (Somewhere Tropical)
2006
light jet (digital c-print)
36″ x 40″ inches
courtesy of the artist, François Ghebaly, & Silverlens Galleries

Edited by Shu-Ning Liu