Tag Archives: mixed race

Interview with artist Lori Kay

Lori Kay, War Baby/Love Child exhibit

Lori Kay, War Baby/Love Child exhibit

The fourth in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Kip Fulbeck.

— Edited by Bailee Martin

Interview with Kip Fulbeck

Interview with Richard Lou

Interview with Gina Osterloh

Interview with artist Kip Fulbeck

The third in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Kip Fulbeck.

Image by Kip Fulbeck from The Hapa Project

Image by Kip Fulbeck from The Hapa Project

— Edited by Kendal Feider

Interview with Richard Lou

Interview with Gina Osterloh

Interview with Artist Richard Lou

The second in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Richard Lou.

p._40_art_1

https://soundcloud.com/com495/november-11-2013-richard-lou-1

— Edited by Seo Song

Interview with Gina Osterloh

Interview with Gina Osterloh

After visiting the “War Baby Love Child” exhibit of mixed race Asian American art at the Wing Luke Museum, we interviewed several of the artists.

This first podcast is an interview with Gina Osterloh. Keep checking back for more interviews.

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Rapture (Somewhere Tropical)
2006
light jet (digital c-print)
36″ x 40″ inches
courtesy of the artist, François Ghebaly, & Silverlens Galleries

Edited by Shu-Ning Liu

Throwing Shade: A Battle for More Colors At Macy’s

Foundation ShadesFoundation at the Shiseido department of Macy’s sheds light on the color battle. Fair shades like “Ivory 12” and “Creamy Beige 06” are put on front display, with deeper tones towards the back.

Lisa looking for Makeup

Lisa Brown, 47, is shown searching for her correct foundation match. She explains, “I always have problems finding a tone that matches my skin. I don’t understand why they don’t make colors for us!” Continue reading

This isn’t an Afro!: On being brown, German, and American

My mom is white and my dad is black. My father was in the Army and my mother is native German.

When I was six I went to a kindergarten nestled in the foothills of a German village. I don’t have many memories of being a six years old. I remember my parent’s apartment, a little old lady who didn’t like me because I destroyed her bushes, and that I only spoke German, but I fully understood my Dad’s English.

Every winter in Germany, little kids dress up and reenact that story about the Three Kings who follow the North Star. One of those kings is African, so usually a little white German kid is painted brown in the face. I was chosen to be one of the three kings.  Guess which one I was? They saved on face paint that year.

My kindergarten mates always teased me for being brown. When I complained to my mother, she told me to tell them that they were “Weiss wie Kase” (white as cheese). They continued to tease me and my curly hair. I told my parents that I wished that I looked more like my mom and not like my Dad.

babydoll

me and my white baby doll

I grew up in Germany for the majority of my life. I was always surrounded by white women and men. My cousins were white and blond. You could easily get a brush though their hair without it getting caught. There were very few people that were not white, and if they weren’t white they were Turkish, Greek or Italian. But they were never as brown as me. When I would play “Spice Girls” with my friends they would always force me to be Scary Spice. I’m sure that in Germany there was a lack of brown dolls even available. I mean there weren’t even any brown people in my cartoons, but I’m also certain that I would have picked the white doll regardless because that’s what I taught was pretty and normal.  Even in pretend, I couldn’t escape my “otherness.” Continue reading

Growing Pains: Pocahontas and Racial Ambiguity

In looking through the abyss of my old Facebook albums recently, I stumbled upon a picture that made me cringe: myself on Halloween during my first year at the University of Washington.

gpp

Now, it wasn’t the awkward facial expression I made that had me wincing (why would a person think sticking out their tongue would make them look cute?), but instead was the costume I wore: In the grainy, dimly lit photo, I stood in a tan, fringed dress; a brown leather belt around my waist; painted below my left eye was a single red stripe; my hair in two braids with a woven headband along my forehead and a single feather tucked behind my head.

I was dressed up as my interpretation of Pocahontas.

Continue reading