Tag Archives: race

La Pulga: Redefining the Flea Market

IMG_2355The flea market is usually defined as a market, typically outdoors, selling secondhand goods.  In the Latino community these flea markets are called “Pulgas” and are filled with first hand goods that speak of the values their race carries.   A person might think a “pulga” signifies cheap, dirty, low quality; and a place you might avoid if you have never been to one. This flea market is filled with life and items that their community cherishes.

Take a look into the world of a “pulga”, located in Portland, Oregon.

The first thing you notice how much this culture values is their religion and faith.

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An abundance of gold is displayed for costumers to try on and buy

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Images of Virgin Mary signify the importance of religion

The second thing you will notice as you walk around are all the different types of clothing displayed for sale. There is quite a variety for many occasions.

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“Quinceñera” dresses displayed for a girl’s 15th birthday celebration

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Traditional Mexican boots showcased

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Dresses for the little ones

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Classic rival soccer jerseys

At the heart of each pulga is the food. While each vendor has a specialty to reel you in to try and buy, everything is authentic and freshly prepared. You can witness how things are made with love and care,

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Food the heart of a Pulga

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“Duros” a tasty Mexican snack

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Fresh Fruit is always near by

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Kids having a hard time picking out a snack

The “pulga” is more than diverse than what you may think when you hear the term flea market. The items at the market speak out about what is important to this a culture. While some in our society may view the items as second class, they are in fact first class items to others.

 Adriana Pedroza

pedroa@uw.edu

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Macklemore: White Man in Hip-Hop

Photo by: The Come Up Show

Photo by: The Come Up Show

Ben Haggerty (Macklemore) is famous for his album The Heist (produced by Ryan Lewis), which was on the Billboard charts and ranked first on iTunes back in 2012. The Seattle rapper is often praised for advocating equality and expressing his opinions on sensitive issues regarding minorities. Aside from his music supporting LGBT rights called “Same Love”, he opened up to discuss about his racial identity and the effects it had on his career during an interview with Rolling Stone.

            As a White man in hip-hop, he admitted that he has benefited from “white privilege”, and would not have been as successful he were Black. He talked about how he was able to receive attention from the media and how his music like “Thrift Shop” could have a wide range of audiences because of his race. “And even though I’m cussing my ass off in the song, the fact that I’m a white guy, parents feel safe. They let their six-year-olds listen to it” (Rolling Stone, 2013).

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Interview with artist Lori Kay

Lori Kay, War Baby/Love Child exhibit

Lori Kay, War Baby/Love Child exhibit

The fourth in our series of interviews with artists from the War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art, currently on display at the Wing Luke Museum. Click below the picture to hear the short podcast with Kip Fulbeck.

— Edited by Bailee Martin

Interview with Kip Fulbeck

Interview with Richard Lou

Interview with Gina Osterloh

How Orange is the New Black is not the New White(out)

1st photo

Image via Complex.com

In 2008, the NAACP released a report called Out of Focus, Out of Sync, in which they critiqued what they called a “whiteout” of American TV, drawing attention to both the complete neglect of actors of color on television, and a severe lack of writers of color, too. As a somewhat serious television connoisseur, I’d argue that over the next five years nothing really changed much, save for the rise of Mindy Kaling and Damon Wayans, Jr.’s turns on both ABC’s Happy Endings and FOX’s The New Girl.

This barren media landscape changed for the better this summer with the arrival of Netflix’s third foray into original programming: Orange is the New Black. Ostensibly the story of a privileged white woman sent to a women’s prison called Litchfield Penitentiary for carrying a bag of cash in a drug deal a decade prior, OITNB expands what could have been a limited universe by constructing fully realized characters, ones which offer rare depictions of underrepresented groups: namely women of color, lesbians and the transgendered. In doing so, it pushes back on much of the scholarship surrounding typical media representations. Continue reading

South Seattle, 98118: Everyday Diversity

Fou Lee Market and Deli; my parents and grandparents have been buying groceries for foreign dishes here for years!

Fou Lee Market and Deli; my parents and grandparents have been buying groceries for foreign dishes here for years!

Seattle's Filipino Influence Top: The Filipino Community Center aka the Filipino after party spot (I'm probably going to have my wedding reception here). Bottom: A Bridge named after Filipino Nationalist Jose Rizal.

Seattle’s Filipino Influence
Top: The Filipino Community Center aka the Filipino after party spot (I’m probably going to have my wedding reception here).
Bottom: A Bridge named after Filipino Nationalist Jose Rizal.

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